Tuesday, May 31, 2011

New evidence suggests acrylamide can cause cancer



New evidence suggests acrylamide can cause cancer

What is acrylamide?

Acrylamide is a chemical widely used during the manufacturing of papers, dyes, and other industrial products. It can also be formed when certain foods are cooked at high temperatures. Frying, baking, or roasting certain foods, such as potatoes or grains, can create acrylamide. French fries and potato chips, for example, may have measurable acrylamide levels. Acrylamide is also found in cigarette smoke.

New evidence suggests acrylamide can cause cancer



New evidence suggests acrylamide can cause cancer

What is acrylamide?

Acrylamide is a chemical widely used during the manufacturing of papers, dyes, and other industrial products. It can also be formed when certain foods are cooked at high temperatures. Frying, baking, or roasting certain foods, such as potatoes or grains, can create acrylamide. French fries and potato chips, for example, may have measurable acrylamide levels. Acrylamide is also found in cigarette smoke.

Nacogdoches Vietnam vets honor Memorial Day

Nacogdoches Vietnam vets honor Memorial Day

Nancy French also accepted the Silver Rose Award in memory of her husband.

"He never really cared that much about medals, he was like you got to do what you got to do," French said. "But underneath all that, secretly, I think he would've loved the fact that these guys were here and they gave this to me. I'm sure he's beaming. I'm sure he is."

"We wished we could've given it to her veteran, but it was pretty overwhelming," Hill said.

Nacogdoches Vietnam vets honor Memorial Day

Nacogdoches Vietnam vets honor Memorial Day

Nancy French also accepted the Silver Rose Award in memory of her husband.

"He never really cared that much about medals, he was like you got to do what you got to do," French said. "But underneath all that, secretly, I think he would've loved the fact that these guys were here and they gave this to me. I'm sure he's beaming. I'm sure he is."

"We wished we could've given it to her veteran, but it was pretty overwhelming," Hill said.

Tests begin into alleged U.S. chemical dumping in South Korea


Tests begin into alleged U.S. chemical dumping in South Korea

"Soil and underground water will be taken in the areas where toxic chemicals were allegedly buried," said the statement from the South Korean Defense Ministry. Once testing is finished, the government will decide on how to test more than 80 other sites -- all former bases.

A joint U.S.- South Korean investigation is being conducted at Camp Carroll to test the validity of allegations


Tests begin into alleged U.S. chemical dumping in South Korea


Tests begin into alleged U.S. chemical dumping in South Korea

"Soil and underground water will be taken in the areas where toxic chemicals were allegedly buried," said the statement from the South Korean Defense Ministry. Once testing is finished, the government will decide on how to test more than 80 other sites -- all former bases.

A joint U.S.- South Korean investigation is being conducted at Camp Carroll to test the validity of allegations


Canada probes use of toxic chemical





Canada probes use of toxic chemical





Substandard Hygiene Practices At Some VA Hospitals

Substandard Hygiene Practices At Some VA Hospitals

Over the last 24 months 13,000 veterans have been advised to have a blood test to check for infections caused by lack of hygiene at VA hospitals in Tennessee, Georgia, Missouri, Ohio and Florida. Reports about unsanitary conditions at VA hospitals has irked a significant number of veterans and politicians.

A dentist at Dayton VA Medical Center regularly failed to sterilize equipment, he also used the same dirty latex gloves on consecutive patients - practices which raise the risk of spreading blood-borne diseases, such as hepatitis or HIV.


Substandard Hygiene Practices At Some VA Hospitals

Substandard Hygiene Practices At Some VA Hospitals

Over the last 24 months 13,000 veterans have been advised to have a blood test to check for infections caused by lack of hygiene at VA hospitals in Tennessee, Georgia, Missouri, Ohio and Florida. Reports about unsanitary conditions at VA hospitals has irked a significant number of veterans and politicians.

A dentist at Dayton VA Medical Center regularly failed to sterilize equipment, he also used the same dirty latex gloves on consecutive patients - practices which raise the risk of spreading blood-borne diseases, such as hepatitis or HIV.


June Is Lane Courtesy Month

OFF THE WIRE
June Is Lane Courtesy Month
Two key principles of traffic safety are not understood – certainly not practiced – by much of the driving public. Some may argue that lane courtesy and proper lane merging techniques are law enforcement issues. Indeed, most states do have laws that that count the obstruction of traffic by either hanging out in the left lane or by blocking necessary merging as infractions.
The trouble is that both types of violations are difficult to enforce. And when has the issuance of more tickets truly provided a long-term solution for a traffic issue?
The NMA prefers to view lane courtesy and lane merging as educational issues. That is why for several years now, we have designated June as Lane Courtesy Month and have used the opportunity to explain the benefits of staying out of the left lane unless passing slower traffic on the right.
Here is a link to our Memorial Day press release highlighting the primary advantages of lane courtesy. Included is a link to an informative summary by the Federal Highway Administration of how best to merge with other traffic when approaching a lane closure. This NMA press release was distributed to several thousand national media outlets last week.
Our work will not be done until each and every driver understands the importance of lane courtesy and lane merging to everyday traffic flow and safety.
Please do your part by passing along the link to the NMA release to fellow motorists. Highway travelers everywhere will benefit. ♦

Letter to Monsanto - Britain-Vietnam Friendship Society

Britain-Vietnam Friendship Society
Flat 2, 26 Tomlins Grove, London E3 4NX
Secretary: Len Aldis
Tel: 0208 980 7146. Mobile: 0779 657 1017
e-mail: lenaldis@yahoo.co.uk; www.lenaldis.co.uk
Skype: Len.Aldis



24 August 2011


Board of Directors
Monsanto Company
800 North Lindbergh Boulevard
St Louis. MO 63167
c/o David F. Snively. Secretary


Ref: 10 August 1961 – 10 August 2011

Dear Mr Snively,

Fifty years ago this August, United States Forces began spraying an herbicide manufactured by your company over South Vietnam. During the ten-year period, eighty million litres were sprayed. Agent Orange is the commonly known name of the herbicide.

You may not be aware of the part played by your company in this criminal act, but there have been many protests here in the UK and many other countries at the use of Agent Orange on Vietnam. I have called in at your office in Ho Chi Minh City in the hope of meeting the director and inviting him to the Peace Village at Tu Du Hospital where he would have seen as I have seen the results of your product in jars containing unborn babies, a sight not many people could stomach seeing.

I would have then taken him to see the living victims of Agent Orange, the children with various deformities, no eyes, minus one or two limbs, twisted bodies etc etc etc, due to your product Agent Orange. Unfortunately he used the excuse that he would be out of the city when I was due to arrive, a pity, because he would have had the opportunity to speak to the doctors and nurses who give these youngsters their love and care, trying to help them live a normal life. And if he did not grasp the point, I would have told him that the youngsters were born many years after the war ended in 1975.

Mr Snively, you do not have to travel to Vietnam to see the people who have been affected by your company’s product Agent Orange. In the US there are thousands of Vietnam Veterans suffering from illnesses and disabilities, as are their children, contact the various veterans’ organisations in the US.

In Vietnam there are near to four million such victims, of all ages, many not able to be treated in a hospital or a clinic. Many live at home, in small towns and communes throughout the country. These tragic victims and their parents need our help and the help of your company that made profits running into $billions in manufacturing Agent Orange.

On leaving the peace village I would have asked your colleague in Ho Chi Minh City: “what does it feel like working for a company that has caused this to happen to the children of your country? I ask you the same question. Yes Mr Nively, there are many American children suffering from Agent Orange.

On 29th July I shall arrive in Ho Chi Minh City to see again these youngsters, and to have meetings, then on 6th August will fly up to Hanoi for an international conference being held on 8th, 9th and 10th, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the use of Agent Orange, while there I shall, along with other international delegates, visit more victims.

In the speech I intend to make at the conference I shall call upon the companies such as yours to accept its responsibility for the horrific damage it has done to the people of Vietnam, and to make compensation to the victims, to fund the building of small clinics, to build respite homes in the communes where the parents can rest from their 24 hour caring of their sons/daughters.

I need not tell you or your board members that many thousands of Vietnamese have died in the past fifty-years and until Monsanto, Dow Chemicals, DuPont and the other companies accept responsibilities, many more thousands will die, those who survive birth in the coming years will suffer as today’s victims are suffering. The effects of Monsanto’s Agent Orange have gone into the third generation of the Vietnamese. Soon, if not already, it will enter into the fourth.

When you place this letter in front of your board members, I hope it will be met with a positive response, not only for them to accept responsibility for the damage done to the people and land of Vietnam, but also to give financial and practical support to the victims and their families.

Such a response will be appreciated.

Look forward to your reply.

Yours sincerely,
Len Aldis
Secretary




Letter to Monsanto - Britain-Vietnam Friendship Society

Britain-Vietnam Friendship Society
Flat 2, 26 Tomlins Grove, London E3 4NX
Secretary: Len Aldis
Tel: 0208 980 7146. Mobile: 0779 657 1017
e-mail: lenaldis@yahoo.co.uk; www.lenaldis.co.uk
Skype: Len.Aldis



24 August 2011


Board of Directors
Monsanto Company
800 North Lindbergh Boulevard
St Louis. MO 63167
c/o David F. Snively. Secretary


Ref: 10 August 1961 – 10 August 2011

Dear Mr Snively,

Fifty years ago this August, United States Forces began spraying an herbicide manufactured by your company over South Vietnam. During the ten-year period, eighty million litres were sprayed. Agent Orange is the commonly known name of the herbicide.

You may not be aware of the part played by your company in this criminal act, but there have been many protests here in the UK and many other countries at the use of Agent Orange on Vietnam. I have called in at your office in Ho Chi Minh City in the hope of meeting the director and inviting him to the Peace Village at Tu Du Hospital where he would have seen as I have seen the results of your product in jars containing unborn babies, a sight not many people could stomach seeing.

I would have then taken him to see the living victims of Agent Orange, the children with various deformities, no eyes, minus one or two limbs, twisted bodies etc etc etc, due to your product Agent Orange. Unfortunately he used the excuse that he would be out of the city when I was due to arrive, a pity, because he would have had the opportunity to speak to the doctors and nurses who give these youngsters their love and care, trying to help them live a normal life. And if he did not grasp the point, I would have told him that the youngsters were born many years after the war ended in 1975.

Mr Snively, you do not have to travel to Vietnam to see the people who have been affected by your company’s product Agent Orange. In the US there are thousands of Vietnam Veterans suffering from illnesses and disabilities, as are their children, contact the various veterans’ organisations in the US.

In Vietnam there are near to four million such victims, of all ages, many not able to be treated in a hospital or a clinic. Many live at home, in small towns and communes throughout the country. These tragic victims and their parents need our help and the help of your company that made profits running into $billions in manufacturing Agent Orange.

On leaving the peace village I would have asked your colleague in Ho Chi Minh City: “what does it feel like working for a company that has caused this to happen to the children of your country? I ask you the same question. Yes Mr Nively, there are many American children suffering from Agent Orange.

On 29th July I shall arrive in Ho Chi Minh City to see again these youngsters, and to have meetings, then on 6th August will fly up to Hanoi for an international conference being held on 8th, 9th and 10th, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the use of Agent Orange, while there I shall, along with other international delegates, visit more victims.

In the speech I intend to make at the conference I shall call upon the companies such as yours to accept its responsibility for the horrific damage it has done to the people of Vietnam, and to make compensation to the victims, to fund the building of small clinics, to build respite homes in the communes where the parents can rest from their 24 hour caring of their sons/daughters.

I need not tell you or your board members that many thousands of Vietnamese have died in the past fifty-years and until Monsanto, Dow Chemicals, DuPont and the other companies accept responsibilities, many more thousands will die, those who survive birth in the coming years will suffer as today’s victims are suffering. The effects of Monsanto’s Agent Orange have gone into the third generation of the Vietnamese. Soon, if not already, it will enter into the fourth.

When you place this letter in front of your board members, I hope it will be met with a positive response, not only for them to accept responsibility for the damage done to the people and land of Vietnam, but also to give financial and practical support to the victims and their families.

Such a response will be appreciated.

Look forward to your reply.

Yours sincerely,
Len Aldis
Secretary




Finally.

Paint done.  Tank on.  Fender on.  Side mount plate bracket/tail light doesn't work.  Fack.  Wiring sucks.  Everything else is done...for now.

Remember folks, it's Summer time.  There are lots of bikes on the road.  Shoulder check, then shoulder check again and then check all your mirrors please.  I don't want you running me over.  Thanks.



Had to forward this one!

Chat with Grandson

I was eating lunch with my 10 year old grandson at school when I asked him, "Did you know that President's Day is tomorrow?"
He nodded.
So I asked "Do you know what that means?"
I was waiting for something "profound", since who knows what they teach
them these days, as most civics subjects have been deemed "old fashioned",
"politically incorrect", and "non-inclusive" in most school districts.
He said,
"President's Day is when Obama steps out of the White House,
and if he sees his shadow, ........
we have 2 more years of unemployment."
I was so proud I almost snorted out my iced tea!!

MONSANTO: Children of the Corn: GMOs Don't Qualify As Food

*AO Legacy posts as many articles is as possible because we believe in free speech. This does not mean, however, Agent Orange Legacy necessarily shares the opinion of these same authors.

Children of the Corn: GMOs Don't Qualify As Food

Hein explained that they had taken antibodies from women with a rare condition known as immune infertility, isolated the genes that regulated the manufacture of those infertility antibodies, and, using genetic engineering techniques, had inserted the genes into ordinary corn seeds used to produce corn plants.

Isn't keeping GMOs unlabeled a virtual form of mandating them, since that lack of information leaves a population prey to them? Does a population have a right to sue the government based on such forced exposure? ? Is there any connection between a current raw milk lawsuit in which the FDA claims the public has no right to choose its food or any right to its health, and the government/corporations creating an additional means of trapping the public into consuming GMOs?

Meanwhile, GE-corn, GE-soy, GE-cotton seed oil, GE-canola, are in most processed foods in the US. Consumers have little idea they are there, little means to distinguish them from other items, and they were never tested for safety for human consumption. Yet studies in animals repeatedly show severe organ damage and infertility/sterility.


MONSANTO: Children of the Corn: GMOs Don't Qualify As Food

*AO Legacy posts as many articles is as possible because we believe in free speech. This does not mean, however, Agent Orange Legacy necessarily shares the opinion of these same authors.

Children of the Corn: GMOs Don't Qualify As Food

Hein explained that they had taken antibodies from women with a rare condition known as immune infertility, isolated the genes that regulated the manufacture of those infertility antibodies, and, using genetic engineering techniques, had inserted the genes into ordinary corn seeds used to produce corn plants.

Isn't keeping GMOs unlabeled a virtual form of mandating them, since that lack of information leaves a population prey to them? Does a population have a right to sue the government based on such forced exposure? ? Is there any connection between a current raw milk lawsuit in which the FDA claims the public has no right to choose its food or any right to its health, and the government/corporations creating an additional means of trapping the public into consuming GMOs?

Meanwhile, GE-corn, GE-soy, GE-cotton seed oil, GE-canola, are in most processed foods in the US. Consumers have little idea they are there, little means to distinguish them from other items, and they were never tested for safety for human consumption. Yet studies in animals repeatedly show severe organ damage and infertility/sterility.


Agent Orange Korea: U.S. Army sprayed defoliant over DMZ in 1955: ex-soldier

U.S. Army sprayed defoliant over DMZ in 1955: ex-soldier

A former South Korean soldier testified for the first time Monday that from its aircraft, the U.S. military sprayed a defoliant over the Demilitarized Zone in 1955 ― more than a decade earlier than news media recently reported.

“It was in 1955 when I was working at the 15th Army Division (in Cheolwon, Gangwon Province) ― one year after I joined the military. The U.S. military mobilized its choppers and other aircraft and sprayed defoliant three to four times a month over the DMZ,” Eum Do-nam, 77, told reporters.

According to U.S. government documents released to media, the U.S. began research to develop defoliants during World War II.


In 1952, it developed Agent Purple and airborne equipment to spray it, intending to use them in the Korean War. News reports said the government documents show the U.S. used an herbicide in Puerto Rico in 1956.

All this appears to back Eum’s claims that the defoliant, known to cause cancer, fetal deformities and mental illnesses, was sprayed in the middle of the 1950s in Korea.

Eum has received government compensation since he was registered as a defoliant victim in 2007.

The taskforce is to probe the possible contamination at 85 sites that the U.S. returned to the South Korean government between 1990 and 2003 without any environmental surveys as the environmental rules, established in the Status of Forces Agreement in 2001, took effect in May 2003.


Agent Orange Korea: U.S. Army sprayed defoliant over DMZ in 1955: ex-soldier

U.S. Army sprayed defoliant over DMZ in 1955: ex-soldier

A former South Korean soldier testified for the first time Monday that from its aircraft, the U.S. military sprayed a defoliant over the Demilitarized Zone in 1955 ― more than a decade earlier than news media recently reported.

“It was in 1955 when I was working at the 15th Army Division (in Cheolwon, Gangwon Province) ― one year after I joined the military. The U.S. military mobilized its choppers and other aircraft and sprayed defoliant three to four times a month over the DMZ,” Eum Do-nam, 77, told reporters.

According to U.S. government documents released to media, the U.S. began research to develop defoliants during World War II.


In 1952, it developed Agent Purple and airborne equipment to spray it, intending to use them in the Korean War. News reports said the government documents show the U.S. used an herbicide in Puerto Rico in 1956.

All this appears to back Eum’s claims that the defoliant, known to cause cancer, fetal deformities and mental illnesses, was sprayed in the middle of the 1950s in Korea.

Eum has received government compensation since he was registered as a defoliant victim in 2007.

The taskforce is to probe the possible contamination at 85 sites that the U.S. returned to the South Korean government between 1990 and 2003 without any environmental surveys as the environmental rules, established in the Status of Forces Agreement in 2001, took effect in May 2003.


The Children’s Center concept has chance of being included - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIESH)

The Children’s Center concept has chance of being included - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIESH)


Birth Defect Research for Children

NIEHS - Children's Centers to Study the Prenatal Effects of Dioxins

I attended the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIESH) council meeting on Thursday. One of the presentations was on the Strategic Planning Process. The Visionary Ideas have now been converted to PDF files which may be accessed by clicking HERE.

The Children’s Center concept is in the first section Affected/Susceptible Populations. The ideas are in alphabetical order. Our concept had 115 comments and as I understand it 767 votes at the time of the close of voting.

The next phase will be a meeting in July of 200 participants. Half of these will be scientists. They may discuss the ideas that were submitted on the web or they may add other ideas to the mix.

If you follow down the page on the Strategic Planning Process you will see the opportunities for public comments at various stages in the process. In the final stages, all ideas will be considered and discussed.

I think that the Children’s Center has a chance of being included if there are scientists at NIESH who feel this concept would fit within the framework of the work they are doing. Some of the presentations like the one on Epigenetics/Epigenomics at the recent meeting suggested possibilities particularly in the area of looking for definable markers that would be consistent in all the affected childen of Vietnam veterans.

Thank you again for all you did to support Children’s Center idea. I am on monthly conference calls with members of NIESH so I will let you know anything else I hear about the process.

With best regards,
Betty

Betty Mekdeci
Executive Director, Birth Defect Research for Children
http://www.birthdefects.org
976 Lake Baldwin Lane, Suite 107
Orlando FL 32814 407-895-0802

The Children’s Center concept has chance of being included - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIESH)

The Children’s Center concept has chance of being included - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIESH)


Birth Defect Research for Children

NIEHS - Children's Centers to Study the Prenatal Effects of Dioxins

I attended the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIESH) council meeting on Thursday. One of the presentations was on the Strategic Planning Process. The Visionary Ideas have now been converted to PDF files which may be accessed by clicking HERE.

The Children’s Center concept is in the first section Affected/Susceptible Populations. The ideas are in alphabetical order. Our concept had 115 comments and as I understand it 767 votes at the time of the close of voting.

The next phase will be a meeting in July of 200 participants. Half of these will be scientists. They may discuss the ideas that were submitted on the web or they may add other ideas to the mix.

If you follow down the page on the Strategic Planning Process you will see the opportunities for public comments at various stages in the process. In the final stages, all ideas will be considered and discussed.

I think that the Children’s Center has a chance of being included if there are scientists at NIESH who feel this concept would fit within the framework of the work they are doing. Some of the presentations like the one on Epigenetics/Epigenomics at the recent meeting suggested possibilities particularly in the area of looking for definable markers that would be consistent in all the affected childen of Vietnam veterans.

Thank you again for all you did to support Children’s Center idea. I am on monthly conference calls with members of NIESH so I will let you know anything else I hear about the process.

With best regards,
Betty

Betty Mekdeci
Executive Director, Birth Defect Research for Children
http://www.birthdefects.org
976 Lake Baldwin Lane, Suite 107
Orlando FL 32814 407-895-0802

Adult Autism Residential Care: Close the Institutions But First Provide An Alternative

My younger son Conor  is 15.  He is not a very high functioning, celebrity "autie" or "aspie".  My son actually has an Autistic Disorder with "profound developmental delays".   He is living a great life now, at home, with a Mom and Dad, who take incredible joy in his company and at school where he has been treated very well by school and district officials. His adult care prospects in New Brunswick though are grim and they are not getting any better as successive governments, Conservative and Liberal, have failed to face the realities of adult autism care. His prospects will remain grim until government and the powerful New Brunswick Association for Community Living face reality and fill the gap that exists for severely autistic adults in residential care ... the gap between inadequate group homes and life in a psychiatric hospital. 


New Brunswick has done very well in developing a leading model of early autism intervention service delivery.  My son's autism challenges have been well accommodated in school  although there is much improvement that could be made across the system as a whole especially in rural schools.  Not all New Brunswick autistic school children have received appropriate accommodation for their autism challenges. On the adult level New Brunswick has stood still, has twiddled its thumbs and done nothing to improve the adult autism residential care "system".


Conor is a great joy in our life but Conor's Autistic Disorder and  Intellectual Disability impose serious functional limitations on his ability to live and enjoy life to the fullest.   He is now 6 feet tall and growing.  Like his Dad at a much younger age he has a very powerful muscular physique.  With his serious challenges he will require, when his parents can not provide care because of old age or death, and for the rest of his life, full time, 24/7, adult residential care.  Currently in New Brunswick that usually means either a psychiatric hospital placement or placement in a home with staff who are not properly trained and without the security and expert supervision  his condition requires.  In some cases ad hoc arrangements such as placement in a hotel room or on the grounds of a correctional facility or export to another province or American state facility have been made.  The CBC in Autism services needed for N.B. adults spoke with New Brunswick autism expert Paul McDonnell:



"What is needed is a range of residential and non-residential services and these services need to be staffed with behaviourally trained supervisors and therapists." ... In the past we have had the sad spectacle of individuals with autism being sent off to institutional settings such as the Campbellton psychiatric hospital, hospital wards, prisons, and even out of the country at enormous expense and without any gains to the individual, the family or the community," he said.



Among the reforms that the UNB professor is calling for is an enhanced group home system where homes would be connected to a major centre that would develop ongoing training and leadership. The larger centre could also offer services for people who have mild conditions. But, he said, it could also be used to offer permanent residential care for individuals with more severe diagnoses.



"Such a secure centre would not be based on a traditional 'hospital' model but should, itself, be integrated into the community in a dynamic manner, possibly as part of a private residential development," he writes. "The focus must be on education, positive living experiences and individualized curricula. The key to success is properly trained professionals and staff.
"


Canadian governments, including successive Conservative and Liberal governments here in New Brunswick, have failed to provide adequate, decent residential care for adults with autism disorders.  A couple of years ago I attended a meeting at the Campbellton psychiatric hospital in Northern New Brunswick.  A major question to be answered was whether the facility should remain open or be closed.  The answer was put to a vote and the answer was unanimous: the psychiatric hospital must remain open until real alternatives are developed and in place.  I was part of that unanimous decision. I do not want my son to live in a hospital but I know he is unlikely to receive adequate residential care in a New Brunswick group home. 


 In 'What happens if I'm not around?' mother of autistic teenager asks"   journalist Michael Tutton, as part of an excellent series reporting the inadequacies of adult care facing many adults with disabilities  in Canada,  reports his discussion with a spokeswoman for the British Columbia Association for Community Living, an advocacy group for people with disabilities:





"Faith Bodnar, the executive director of the association, says it's ironic that the issue is unfolding in B.C. because it was a pioneer in promoting the shutdown of larger facilities for people with intellectual disabilities in the mid-1990s.
It also created a network of new living arrangements in the community, such as home-sharing where people with intellectual disabilities share homes with caregivers who receive monthly funding.
However, Bodnar says the association receives emails daily from parents who say the supports they need for their grown-up children aren't there.
"We are running a serious risk of people not having the supports to be safe in the services they have," says Bodnar.
"Our members are telling us that they're concerned that safety issues are developing."
The situation in British Columbia is only ironic to those who have believed that the solution to helping seriously challenged adults with mental health and developmental disorders, including autism disorders, is to simply close institutions and place everyone in community settings without accommodating their disability based challenges.  There is in fact a need for some residential facilities for severely autistic adults  to bridge the gap between community group homes and psychiatric hospitals as noted by autism expert Paul McDonnell.  For those most severely affected a center, integrated in the community but providing the expert care, educational programs, recreational services and security that those most severely affected by autism require is badly needed. Such a center will probably be needed for Conor. Such a center is not on the immediate horizon in New Brunswick though where a  highly influential and extremist community inclusion philosophy prevents any discussion, analysis or developmental of alternatives to our current group home/psychiatric hospital system of adult autism residential care. 

In Reference to "What do Police do"

OFF THE WIRE
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/28/politics/28scotus.html
 Justices Rule Police Do Not Have a Constitutional Duty to Protect Someone
 By LINDA GREENHOUSE
Published: June 28, 2005
WASHINGTON, June 27 - The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that the police did not have a constitutional duty to protect a person from harm, even a woman who had obtained a court-issued protective order against a violent husband making an arrest mandatory for a violation.
Skip to next paragraph
Complete Coverage: Monday's Supreme Court Decisions
Forum: Issues Before the Supreme Court
The decision, with an opinion by Justice Antonin Scalia and dissents from Justices John Paul Stevens and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, overturned a ruling by a federal appeals court in Colorado. The appeals court had permitted a lawsuit to proceed against a Colorado town, Castle Rock, for the failure of the police to respond to a woman's pleas for help after her estranged husband violated a protective order by kidnapping their three young daughters, whom he eventually killed.
For hours on the night of June 22, 1999, Jessica Gonzales tried to get the Castle Rock police to find and arrest her estranged husband, Simon Gonzales, who was under a court order to stay 100 yards away from the house. He had taken the children, ages 7, 9 and 10, as they played outside, and he later called his wife to tell her that he had the girls at an amusement park in Denver.
Ms. Gonzales conveyed the information to the police, but they failed to act before Mr. Gonzales arrived at the police station hours later, firing a gun, with the bodies of the girls in the back of his truck. The police killed him at the scene.
The theory of the lawsuit Ms. Gonzales filed in federal district court in Denver was that Colorado law had given her an enforceable right to protection by instructing the police, on the court order, that "you shall arrest" or issue a warrant for the arrest of a violator. She argued that the order gave her a "property interest" within the meaning of the 14th Amendment's due process guarantee, which prohibits the deprivation of property without due process.
The district court and a panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit dismissed the suit, but the full appeals court reinstated it and the town appealed. The Supreme Court's precedents made the appellate ruling a challenging one for Ms. Gonzales and her lawyers to sustain.
A 1989 decision, DeShaney v. Winnebago County, held that the failure by county social service workers to protect a young boy from a beating by his father did not breach any substantive constitutional duty. By framing her case as one of process rather than substance, Ms. Gonzales and her lawyers hoped to find a way around that precedent.
But the majority on Monday saw little difference between the earlier case and this one, Castle Rock v. Gonzales, No. 04-278. Ms. Gonzales did not have a "property interest" in enforcing the restraining order, Justice Scalia said, adding that "such a right would not, of course, resemble any traditional conception of property."
Although the protective order did mandate an arrest, or an arrest warrant, in so many words, Justice Scalia said, "a well-established tradition of police discretion has long coexisted with apparently mandatory arrest statutes."
But Justices Stevens and Ginsburg, in their dissenting opinion, said "it is clear that the elimination of police discretion was integral to Colorado and its fellow states' solution to the problem of underenforcement in domestic violence cases." Colorado was one of two dozen states that, in response to increased attention to the problem of domestic violence during the 1990's, made arrest mandatory for violating protective orders.
"The court fails to come to terms with the wave of domestic violence statutes that provides the crucial context for understanding Colorado's law," the dissenting justices said.
Organizations concerned with domestic violence had watched the case closely and expressed disappointment at the outcome. Fernando LaGuarda, counsel for the National Network to End Domestic Violence, said in a statement that Congress and the states should now act to give greater protection.
In another ruling on Monday, the court rebuked the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, in Cincinnati, for having reopened a death penalty appeal, on the basis of newly discovered evidence, after the ruling had become final.
The 5-to-4 decision, Bell v. Thompson, No. 04-514, came in response to an appeal by the State of Tennessee after the Sixth Circuit removed a convicted murderer, Gregory Thompson, from the state's death row.
After his conviction and the failure of his appeals in state court, Mr. Thompson, with new lawyers, had gone to federal district court seeking a writ of habeas corpus on the ground that his initial lawyers had been constitutionally inadequate. The new lawyers obtained a consultation with a psychologist, who diagnosed Mr. Thompson as schizophrenic.
But the psychologist's report was not included in the file of the habeas corpus petition in district court, which denied the petition. It was not until the Sixth Circuit and then the Supreme Court had also denied his petition, making the case final, that the Sixth Circuit reopened the case, finding that the report was crucial evidence that should have been considered.
In overturning that ruling in an opinion by Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, the majority said the appeals court had abused its discretion in an "extraordinary departure from standard appellate procedures." Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and Justices Scalia, Clarence Thomas and Sandra Day O'Connor joined the opinion.
In a dissenting opinion, Justice Stephen G. Breyer said the majority had relied on rules to the exclusion of justice. Judges need a "degree of discretion, thereby providing oil for the rule-based gears," he said. Justices Stevens, Ginsburg and David H. Souter joined the dissent.
More Articles in Washington

Legislation would repeal helmet law in Pennsylvania

OFF THE WIRE
A state lawmaker has reintroduced legislation restoring Pennsylvania's motorcycle helmet law.

State Rep. Dan Frankel, D-Allegheny, introduced legislation on May 23 that would reverse a law that went into effect in 2003. That law allows motorcycle riders 21 or older to ride without helmets if they have completed a motorcycle safety course approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation or Motorcycle Safety Foundation.

"The increase in deaths and injuries on our roads and the shattered lives of victims and their families out to be enough to admit the 2003 repeal was a mistake and we should fix it," Frankel said in a prepared statement.

Frankel cited a 2008 study by two University of Pittsburgh professors who analyzed state statistics for helmet use, head injuries and motorcycle deaths. The professors reportedly found that under the 2003 law, head injury deaths increased by 66 percent and head injury hospitalization increased 78 percent.

"Many studies have shown that motorcycle helmets save lives, helmet laws save lives and helmet law repeals lead to increased head injury and deaths. What we found in Pennsylvania was no exception," said Kristen Mertz, University of Pittsburgh professor and co-author of the 2008 study.

Alliance of Bikers Aimed Toward Education of Pennsylvania (ABATE) spoke out against Frankel's proposal. In a statement on its website, the organization challenged Frankel and the University of Pittsburgh's assessment.

The organization notes that the state Legislature researched the matter before the helmet mandate was lifted in 2003.

"Two reports were issued, and the findings showed in both cases that the fatality rate remained the same at 5.9 per 10,000 registrations," ABATE says in its online statement. "Rep. Frankel did not like the findings of our own state's reports, so he prefers to hang his helmet on a Pitt study of Pa. motorcycle deaths which contradicts the PennDOT statistics and state analysis."

East coast - Diablos Motorcycle Accident Sends Two to Hospital


OFF THE WIRE
 Laurie Rich Salerno

Three bikes went down in traffic during motorcycle gang's annual memory ride.

East Main Street between Parker Avenue and Newton Street is closed while Meriden Police work to reconstruct a three-motorcycle accident that sent two members of the Diablos Motorcycle gang to area hospitals – one with head injuries.

The accident occured at about 11:15 a.m., according to witnesses, when three motorcycle drivers with the Diablos "dumped" their motorcycles at the intersection of East Main Street and Cottage Street. Each vehicle had two riders, and was part of a larger"memory ride" to visit gravesites of fallen club members.

A female passenger was transported to Hartford Hospital with head injuries, and a male driver, who witnesses say was driving the bike she was on, was taken to MidState Hospital in a neck brace and with a possible broken arm. Other bikers in the accident were sitting in lawns on the South side of East Main Street with ice packs, and talk of broken toes, cuts and bruises. A bloodied paper towel lay on the ground underneath police tape surrounding the accident scene at 1 p.m.

Stories as to what made the drivers crash differ.

One Diablos member who was not involved in the crash, but riding behind in a truck, said a van cut the riders off, forcing them to abandon their bikes rather than be hit.

The member declined to give his name, but told Meriden Patch that the bikes were headed East in a middle lane on East Main Street when a green Chevrolet Astrovan shot across East Main Street from a cemetary driveway onto Cottage Street in front of the riders. This he said caused them to turn quickly left and abandon their bikes in the left lane of East Main, rather than hit the van.

The driver of the Astrovan, a Meriden man named Jackson, who asked that his surname not be included in this article, said he had nothing to do with the accident. He said he was bringing his wife and two small children home from a store, and heard the crash after he made a left turn from East Main Street onto Cottage Avenue. He said he called 911 from his phone and stayed to help victims, and was surprised when he heard the riders were blaming the accident on him.

"Their speed was too much," his wife Mellanie said, attributing that to the motorcycles' fall. She said she prayed to God that the riders would be OK.

Neighbors at the intersection of East Main Street and Cottage Ave., who were picnicking on their front porch during the investigation, said they also called 911 when they heard the crash, but didn't see anything.

At 12:30, police said the accident was still under investigation.

A Diablos member said the two who were taken from the hospital were both from New Hampshire. The Diablos Motorcycle Club is a national motorcycle gxxg with a chapter in Meriden and clubhouse at 168 Grove St.

During a memory ride, Diablos members caravan to area cemetaries to visit the gravestones of fallen members, according to one Diablos member who declined to give his name.




















http://meriden.patch.com/articles/diablos-motorcycle-accident-sends-two-to-hospital

Filing a Police Complaint

OFF THE WIRE
Filing a police complaint and reporting police brutality and misconduct is a step towards ending this abuse of power by police.
 Never ... ever... walk into a police station by yourself and try to file a police complaint. Civilian testers have shown that you may be harassed or falsely arrested for doing so.
 Police complaints are allegations of misconduct and you as a member of the public can file a police complaint. When someone files a police complaint against a police officer an incident report is placed in the officer's record, so as to hopefully keep the officer from continuing to abuse his or her authority. It also makes the officers superiors aware that there might be a problem with an individual police officer that needs to be addressed.
 Examples of police misconduct:
 Rudeness
 Excessive force
 Soliciting or accepting bribes
 Drinking on duty
 Harassment
 Making a false report (good for alleging in the case of traffic tickets)
 Use of narcotics (on or off duty)
 Discrimination
 Altering information on an official document
 Careless driving (driving rapidly and/or aggressively to a minor call
 Racial or ethnic intimidation
 Malicious threats or assault
 Sexual harassment 
 Police complaints will not get a victim compensated for police abuse. Police complaints are not law suits. If you file a complaint against a police officer and the police "clear" themselves as they often do, the only recourse you may have is a civil law suit. A civil law suit you may receive compensation if you and your attorney can prove damages or civil rights violations.  Contact a competent civil rights attorney if you need more information about filing a law suit for civil rights violations.  
 To file a complaint on a police officer "one of a less serious nature," you want to send a written complaint "certified mail with return receipt requested." You can send the police complaint to Internal Affairs. Certified mail gives you some type of proof that you actually filed a complaint against a police officer.  If you don't send the complaint certified mail the letter sometimes gets lost or misplaced by someone at the police department.
 As soon as possible write down everything that happened. Don't worry about sending your complaint off right away. Wait a few days and go back over your written complaint and see what you might have forgotten the first time you wrote it. There's no need for "emotions" to be involved when you write your complaint and the most important thing is to be truthful! If the police catch you in a lie, your complaint won't be credible nor will any other complaints you send to them in the future. You could even be charged for making a false report against a police officer.
 The more information in your written complaint the better. Your compliant should include:
 Who the officer is your filing a complaint against? Name or badge number.
 What the officer said or did? Was he rude, abusive or used excessive force?
 When it happened? Date and time when the incident occurred.
 Where did it occur? Location the incident took place.
 How did the incident occur? 
 Do you have corroborating witnesses, whose story does not conflict with yours? If you have witnesses you should ask each one of them to write a separate account of the incident.
 Do you have any type of evidence, like pictures or a video recording? If you do don't send the "original" to the police, send a copy. 
 Mail the complaint "certified mail with return receipt requested," to Internal Affairs at the police or sheriffs department where the officer works. The complaint will be investigated and you should receive a letter back from the police agency on the status of your complaint. Most police complaints will be in the favor of the police officer, but the good thing is the complaint will stay on the police officers record.
 The police may try and contact you by phone or mail to do a "follow up" or ask you questions. Answer NO questions and don't go to the police station for an interview. Tell them everything they need to know is in your letter that you sent and then say good bye. Stick to what you said in your complaint letter that you sent and say nothing else!
 There is a time limit on how long you have to file a complaint on a police officer. For minor police misconduct you may have  only 60 days and up to 6 months for more serious allegations.
 If you're interested to know what complaints have been filed against police officers in your community, you may request a copy of that information be sent to you from that police agency. Send your request "certified mail with return receipt requested." Request a copy of complaints of police officers from that agency be mailed to you, under the "Freedom of Information Act" and you would like this information sent to you within 10 days as required by law. DON'T ever walk into a police station and ask for this information! Police officers either start acting real stupid on the subject or they get real pissed and start threatening you.
  Now for the bad news! Police officers don't like to have "complaints" filed on them, nor do they like for citizens to ask for copies of complaints made against other police officers. For some reason police officers think they do no wrong and if they do the public doesn't need to be aware of it.
 Never file a complaint directly with a police agency specially if the complaint is of a serious nature, see an attorney! If you do plan on hiring an attorney, get one who doesn't live in your area. Don't get a lawyer from your town, county or the surrounding counties. Local lawyers work with same police officers, district attorney and judges on a daily basis and may not want to win your case as bad as you do.
 You may also contact your State Attorney General. For serious incidents call the ACLU hot line 1-877-634-5454 or contact the Department of Justice Click here for the (DOJ) site.

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Las Vegas - Bill to repeal motorcycle helmet law suffers blow

OFF THE WIRE
Cy Ryan
http://www.lasvegassun.com/staff/cy-ryan/
CARSON CITY – A bill that would allow a motorcyclist to ride without a helmet might not have much of a future, its sponsor says.
“It has an execution day,” said Sen. Don Gustavson, R-Sparks. “But it still has appeal rights.”
Senate Bill 77 has been sitting in the Senate Finance Committee since April without a hearing.
“I asked for a hearing and never got a reply,” Gustavson said. Asked if the bill would get a hearing, Committee Vice Chairwoman Sheila Leslie replied, “I don’t think so.”
Gustavson said he thinks he has enough backing in the committee and the full Senate if it is ever brought to a hearing.
The bill will probably meet the same fate as two other transportation bills that didn’t survive the Legislature, which is to end June 6.
There was a bill to make not wearing a seatbelt a primary offense, meaning a law enforcement officer could pull over a motorist who wasn't buckled up. Current law permits an officer to issue a citation only if the driver is stopped for another traffic offense.
The measure, Senate Bill 235, fell in the Senate Transportation Committee on a 4-3 vote with Sen. John Lee, D-North Las Vegas, joining three Republicans voting against it.
A bill to revise the law on the installation of an ignition lock following a drunken driving conviction is also stuck in the Senate Transportation Committee.
Current law allows a judge to exempt a person from installing the device if it constitutes an economic hardship. Senate Bill 166 would stop a judge from being able to give that exemption.
Still alive are bills that would prohibit cell phone use by a motorist while driving and a measure to cement into law the ability of taxicab drivers to charge $3 for a passenger to use a credit or debit card.
The cell phone bill, Senate Bill 140, passed the Senate by a 12-9 vote, but has been temporarily placed on hold in the Assembly.
The taxicab surcharge bill will be reported out of the Senate Transportation Committee on Monday, said Committee Chairwoman Shirley Breeden, D-Henderson.

For anarchist, details of life as FBI target, One organizer of anticorporate protests is among dozens of political activists to come under scrutiny of counterterrorism operations.

OFF THE WIRE
JUST A THOUGHT
By COLIN MOYNIHAN
and SCOTT SHANE
The New York Times
A fat sheaf of F.B.I. reports meticulously details the surveillance that counterterrorism agents directed at the one-story house in East Austin. For at least three years, they traced the license plates of cars parked out front, recorded the comings and goings of residents and guests and, in one case, speculated about a suspicious flat object spread out across the driveway.
“The content could not be determined from the street,” an agent observing from his car reported one day in 2005. “It had a large number of multi-colored blocks, with figures and/or lettering,” the report said, and “may be a sign that is to be used in an upcoming protest.”
Actually, the item in question was more mundane.
“It was a quilt,” said Scott Crow, marveling over the papers at the dining table of his ramshackle home, where he lives with his wife, a housemate and a backyard menagerie that includes two goats, a dozen chickens and a turkey. “For a kids’ after-school program.”
Mr. Crow, 44, a self-described anarchist and veteran organizer of anticorporate demonstrations, is among dozens of political activists across the country known to have come under scrutiny from the F.B.I.’s increased counterterrorism operations since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.
Other targets of bureau surveillance, which has been criticized by civil liberties groups and mildly faulted by the Justice Department’s inspector general, have included antiwar activists in Pittsburgh, animal rights advocates in Virginia and liberal Roman Catholics in Nebraska. When such investigations produce no criminal charges, their methods rarely come to light publicly.
But Mr. Crow, a lanky Texas native who works at a recycling center, is one of several Austin activists who asked the F.B.I. for their files, citing the Freedom of Information Act. The 440 heavily-redacted pages he received, many bearing the rubric “Domestic Terrorism,” provide a revealing window on the efforts of the bureau, backed by other federal, state and local police agencies, to keep an eye on people it deems dangerous.
'Fat guy in an S.U.V.'
In the case of Mr. Crow, who has been arrested a dozen times during demonstrations but has never been convicted of anything more serious than trespassing, the bureau wielded an impressive array of tools, the documents show.
The agents watched from their cars for hours at a time — Mr. Crow recalls one regular as “a fat guy in an S.U.V. with the engine running and the air-conditioning on” — and watched gatherings at a bookstore and cafe. For round-the-clock coverage, they attached a video camera to the phone pole across from his house on New York Avenue.
They tracked Mr. Crow’s phone calls and e-mails and combed through his trash, identifying his bank and mortgage companies, which appear to have been served with subpoenas. They visited gun stores where he shopped for a rifle, noting dryly in one document that a vegan animal rights advocate like Mr. Crow made an unlikely hunter. (He says the weapon was for self-defense in a marginal neighborhood.)
They asked the Internal Revenue Service to examine his tax returns, but backed off after an I.R.S. employee suggested that Mr. Crow’s modest earnings would not impress a jury even if his returns were flawed. (He earns $32,000 a year at Ecology Action of Texas, he said.)
They infiltrated political meetings with undercover police officers and informers. Mr. Crow counts five supposed fellow activists who were reporting to the F.B.I.
Mr. Crow seems alternately astonished, angered and flattered by the government’s attention. “I’ve had times of intense paranoia,” he said, especially when he discovered that some trusted allies were actually spies.
“But first, it makes me laugh,” he said. “It’s just a big farce that the government’s created such paper tigers. Al Qaeda and real terrorists are hard to find. We’re easy to find. It’s outrageous that they would spend so much money surveilling civil activists, and anarchists in particular, and equating our actions with Al Qaeda.”
Investigation of political activists The investigation of political activists is an old story for the F.B.I., most infamously in the Cointel program, which scrutinized and sometimes harassed civil rights and antiwar advocates from the 1950s to the 1970s. Such activities were reined in after they were exposed by the Senate’s Church Committee, and F.B.I. surveillance has been governed by an evolving set of guidelines set by attorneys general since 1976.
But the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995 demonstrated the lethal danger of domestic terrorism, and after the Sept. 11 attacks, the F.B.I. vowed never again to overlook terrorists hiding in plain sight. The Qaeda sleeper cells many Americans feared, though, turned out to be rare or nonexistent.
The result, said Michael German, a former F.B.I. agent now at the American Civil Liberties Union, has been a zeal to investigate political activists who pose no realistic threat of terrorism.
“You have a bunch of guys and women all over the country sent out to find terrorism. Fortunately, there isn’t a lot of terrorism in many communities,” Mr. German said. “So they end up pursuing people who are critical of the government.”
Complaints from the A.C.L.U. prompted the Justice Department’s inspector general to assess the F.B.I.’s forays into domestic surveillance. The resulting report last September absolved the bureau of investigating dissenters based purely on their expression of political views. But the inspector general also found skimpy justification for some investigations, uncertainty about whether any federal crime was even plausible in others and a mislabeling of nonviolent civil disobedience as “terrorism.”
Asked about the surveillance of Mr. Crow, an F.B.I. spokesman, Paul E. Bresson, said it would be “inappropriate” to discuss an individual case. But he said that investigations are conducted only after the bureau receives information about possible crimes.
“We do not open investigations based on individuals who exercise the rights afforded to them under the First Amendment,” Mr. Bresson said. “In fact, the Department of Justice and the bureau’s own guidelines for conducting domestic operations strictly forbid such actions.”
It is not hard to understand why Mr. Crow attracted the bureau’s attention. He has deliberately confronted skinheads and Ku Klux Klan members at their gatherings, relishing the resulting scuffles. He claims to have forced corporate executives to move with noisy nighttime protests.
He says he took particular pleasure in a 2003 demonstration for Greenpeace in which activists stormed the headquarters of ExxonMobil in Irving, Tex., to protest its environmental record. Dressed in tiger outfits, protesters carried banners to the roof of the company’s offices, while others wearing business suits arrived in chauffeured Jaguars, forcing frustrated police officers to sort real executives from faux ones.
“It was super fun,” said Mr. Crow, one of the suits, who escaped while 36 other protesters were arrested. “They had ignored us and ignored us. But that one got their attention.”
More amiable than combative
It got the attention of the F.B.I. as well, evidently, leading to the three-year investigation that focused specifically on Mr. Crow. The surveillance documents show that he also turned up in several other investigations of activism in Texas and beyond, from 2001 to at least 2008.
For an aficionado of civil disobedience, Mr. Crow comes across as more amiable than combative. He dropped out of college, toured with an electronic-rock band and ran a successful Dallas antiques business while dabbling in animal rights advocacy. In 2001, captivated by the philosophy of anarchism, he sold his share of the business and decided to become a full-time activist.
Since then, he has led a half-dozen groups and run an annual training camp for protesters. (The camps invariably attracted police infiltrators who were often not hard to spot. “We had a rule,” he said. “If you were burly, you didn’t belong.”) He also helped to found Common Ground Relief, a network of nonprofit organizations created in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.
Anarchism was the catchword for an international terrorist movement at the turn of the 20th century. But Mr. Crow, whose e-mail address contains the phrase “quixotic dreaming,” describes anarchism as a kind of locally oriented self-help movement, a variety of “social libertarianism.”
“I don’t like the state,” he said. “I don’t want to overthrow it, but I want to create alternatives to it.”
This kind of talk appears to have baffled some of the agents assigned to watch him, whose reports to F.B.I. bosses occasionally seem petulant. One agent calls “nonviolent direct action,” a phrase in activists’ materials, “an oxymoron.” Another agent comments, oddly, on Mr. Crow and his wife, Ann Harkness, who have been together for 24 years, writing that “outwardly they did not appear to look right for each other.” At a training session, “most attendees dressed like hippies.”
Such comments stand out amid detailed accounts of the banal: mail in the recycling bin included “a number of catalogs from retail outlets such as Neiman Marcus, Ann Taylor and Pottery Barn.”
Mr. Crow said he hoped the airing of such F.B.I. busywork might deter further efforts to keep watch over him. The last documents he has seen mentioning him date from 2008. But the Freedom of Information Act exempts from disclosure any investigations that are still open.
“I still occasionally see people sitting in cars across the street,” he said. “I don’t think they’ve given up.”
This article, "For Anarchist, Details of Life as F.B.I. Target," first appeared in The New York Times.

Yeah, they used to have "the Patriot Act" in Nazi Germany, too. I believe the German acronym for it is "Gestapo", if I remember correctly. My real problem with this, though, is the following: how come no one follows the CEOs of the banks who conspired to trash our economy around while they visit the grocery store? I guess what I'm asking here is this: how about arresting someone who IS a criminal? Just a thought....